Tag Archives: Fiction

Cohen’s NYT book review, “The Banality of Good”

EVERY MAN DIES ALONE by Hans Fallada

“What Irène Némirovsky’s Suite Française did for wartime France after six decades in obscurity, Fallada does for wartime Berlin”, so writes Roger Cohen in his laudatory review of Hans Fallada’s harrowing Every Man Dies Alone, now available in English more than 60 years after its initial publication in Germany.

A powerful novel based on the real-life exploits of couple Otto and Elise Hampel, whose defiance of Hitler via a postcard campaign led to their eventual and brutal execution, Every Man Dies Alone is, according to the New York Observer, “one of the most immediate and authentic fictional accounts of life during the long nightmare of Nazi rule.”

Click here  to read Cohen’s full review, “The Banality of Good”, and click here to begin reading the book.

The first five commenters will receive a free copy of the new trade paperback edition of the book.

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The Right Answer, And Other Nonexistent Things

THE LAST TOWN ON EARTH by Thomas Mullen

by Thomas Mullen, author of  Last Town on Earth (Random House, 2007).

When reading works of fiction, students often think that there’s a right answer for how they’re supposed to respond to the book.  Surely (as they’re sometimes taught in high school) there’s a specific meaning F. Scott Fitzgerald had in mind with The Great Gatsby’s “green light,” and therefore there’s a right way to read the book and a wrong way.  A novel is a riddle, just a more creative version of a math problem, and students need to figure out the right answer, explain it in a paper, and then they’ll earn their A.  At which point they’re free to put the book away and never think about it again.

But English isn’t Algebra, and sometimes there are lots of right answers.  Or maybe—gasp—there’s no right answer.  Or perhaps it isn’t the answer that’s so important as the journey the reader takes to get there.  The travels with the characters, the experience of viewing the world through someone else’s eyes, the various lessons this act imparts—these will all lead different readers to different opinions, emotions, revelations.  This is true not only with our interpretations about whether a literary symbol has a certain meaning but also our determination as to whether characters did the “right” thing or not. Continue reading

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