Karen Greenberg on the Slow Erosion of Justice after 9/11

9780804138215By Karen J. Greenberg, author of Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State (Crown, May 2016)

In the spring of 2011, Attorney General Eric Holder faced the American public to announce that the five men in US custody who had been charged with the 9/11 conspiracy would not be prosecuted in federal court. Instead, they would be tried by military commissions at Guantanamo Bay. Holder explained that it was a matter of politics: Congress had taken the decision out of his hands. This book is meant to illuminate the larger forces at work during the years leading up to that disappointing decision. Continue reading

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Why Healthy Sleep is Key for Academic Achievement

9781101904008By Arianna Huffington, author of The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night At A Time (Harmony, April 2016)

There is more and more evidence of how sleep deprivation is affecting students, both their physical and mental health and their ability to learn. At the same time, we are living in a golden age of sleep science, revealing all the ways in which sleep plays a vital role in our decision making, emotional intelligence, cognitive function, and creativity – in other words, the building blocks of a great education. This science is already being applied, as many schools have seen positive results from pushing back start times. Continue reading

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On Being a Deaf Writer

9780812986396By Sara Nović, author of Girl at War: A Novel (Random House Trade Paperbacks, March 2016)

Recently my first novel became an audiobook to which I cannot listen. This is not a complaint, exactly; to write a book someone wants to publish in any format is a writer’s dream. But to hold some disc that contains a thing I made, transformed into a thing I can no longer understand, is a quandary few writers experience. To be a Deaf writer is to make a certain kind of shortlist.

Growing up with a progressive hearing loss, I was educated in spoken English alongside my hearing peers; when that became too difficult I learned American Sign Language (ASL) and had interpreters in class. Still, the linguistic modality in which I am most fluent is written English, because in it I have the most access and the most control. When I’m writing I need not be translated for a hearing audience. When I’m reading a book sounds and words are clear; paper never covers its mouth or turns its head. Continue reading

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In this Age of Terrorism, Inside the Criminal Mind is More Relevant than Ever

9780804139908In the wake of recent terrorist attacks across the world, there has been a renewed global conversation about what motivates such criminal behavior, and what can be done to stop it.  As this discussion around violence and other illegal acts develops, Dr. Stanton Samenow’s landmark work Inside the Criminal Mind is more relevant now than ever.

In his recent review of the book, Dr. Michael J. Hurd argued that Inside the Criminal Mind opens “up insights and discussion into the nature of human psychology as something determined primarily by the way a person thinks.”  Placed within the context of Samenow’s profile of a criminal, students can see how the magnitude of crimes have changed since 1984, but the “characteristics of the criminal mind have not.” Continue reading

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“Genius” Grant Winner Matthew Desmond on Eviction, Poverty and Profit in the American City

9780553447439By Matthew Desmond, author of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City (Crown, March 2016)

Request an advanced reader’s copy: email rhacademic@penguinrandomhouse.com with your name, college and course information.

I began this project because I wanted to write a different kind of book about poverty in America. Instead of focusing exclusively on poor people or poor places, I began searching for a process that involved poor and well-off people alike. Eviction—the forced removal of families from their homes—was such a process. Little did I know, at the outset, how immense this problem was, or how devastating its consequences. Continue reading

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Hiding the Truth for Community’s Sake: The Danger of Small Town Dynamics

Amy_Jo_Burns-by-Jen Zilaby Amy Jo Burns, author of Cinderland: A Memoir (Beacon Press, September 2015)

From Steubenville to State College to Missoula, small towns often step into the spotlight where sex crimes are concerned. After the stark details get spun through the news cycle, the towns are left to themselves again, usually divided, impenitent, and often unable to determine what role the community itself played in perpetuating the violence or the criminalization of the victims. As a young woman involved in a small town scandal myself, I can testify to the communal damage that lasts long after journalists and reporters have moved on to the next big story. Continue reading

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To Be Young, Latina, and Bisexual

daisyhernandez-Jorge RivasBy Daisy Hernández, author of A Cup of Water Under My Bed: A Memoir (Beacon Press)

People often ask if it was hard for me, as a journalist, to write a memoir. It wasn’t. In many ways, the people I interviewed over the years for news stories—many of them immigrants, many of them poor—taught me to trust the power of personal stories. One of them was Alaaedien. He drove cabs in New York City, and one day, he picked up a man outside of Grand Central Station. The man was young, and he wanted Alaaedien to take him to upstate New York. The cab ride would cost almost a thousand dollars, Alaaedien explained. That was fine. The young man’s new girlfriend lived upstate. He would pay Alaaedien when they got there. Continue reading

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